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to dominate his second. that is the nation's debt and deficit. we already reached the $16 trillion debt limit set by congress. treasury secretary tim geithner says his accounting tricks and maneuvers can only buy us a couple more months the president wants to call on congress to raise the debt ceiling without drama. he says even the threat, note to raise the debt ceiling could cause a down-tick in the nation's credit rating as it did in 2011. republicans are determined to use that leverage. it may be the only leverage they have to raise the nation's debt ceiling. in the past it has worked to demand spending cuts in exchange for raising the nation's debt ceiling. they intend to do it this time. heather? heather: a lot going on in washington. we hear rumors the president may address the issue of immigration reform. that may be one of the top priorities of his administration. is he expected to talk about that? >> reporter: perhaps but even before that the president is likely to be asked about efforts to curb the nation's gun violence with vice president biden set to give recommendations to the p
before, and have bid have a conversation on how we reduce our deficits further in a sensible way. -- i would have a conversation about how to reduce our deficits in a sensible way. we can talk about how we can make sure we finance our workers getting properly trained and are schools getting the education they deserve. there is a whole growth agenda that is important does well. -- as well. what you have not seen as the notion that has been presented so far by the republicans that deficit reduction will only cover spending cuts, that we will raise the debt ceiling dollar for dollar on spending cuts. there are a whole set of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sens
class is shrinking deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decades. which would stabilize our debt and deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy but it would make it manageable so that it does not crowd out the investments we need to make in people, education, job training, science, medical research. step by step, we made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i have signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that will save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so, we have made progr
presided over three budget surpluses in a row. so for all the talk out there about deficit reduction, making sure our books are balanced, this is the guy who did it. three times. >> the white house chief of staff, jack lew, was nominated by the president this week to replace outgoing treasury secretary timothy geithner. lew is a democratic veteran of washington, 30 years of service. currently he is president obama's chief of staff. earlier lew served as his budget director, and in that job he raised republican hackles. in fact, jeff sessions of alabama, the ranking republican on the senate budget committee, has already said he will try to block mr. lew's confirmation, notably over a statement lew made two years ago. lew was then omb, office of management and budget director. "our budget will get us over the next several years to the point where we can look the american people in the money th speaking to this, senator sessions had this to say. "to look the american people in the eye and make such a statement remains the most direct and important false assertion during ng my entire t i
it back. >>> time 7:17. some fall lists -- 7:10. some analysts say california's budget deficit could possibly be solved by getting oil out of shale in monterey. the monterey shale runs from los angeles to san francisco and macon obtain more than 400 billion barrels of oil. but getting it out, that's tricky. because of the san andre causes fault, the shale rock is not flat so drilling for oil is difficult. however, the u.s. energy information estimates more than $15 -- more than 15 billion barrels of oil can be recovered using new technology. >>> 7:11. how to move forward. the big debate taking place in newtown, connecticut, one month after the tragic school shooting. >> also, what will lance armstrong say? new details about his big interview with oprah just hours away. >>> it's cold out there. lots of upper 20s, 30s. doesn't matter. some of the wind chills in the teens. it will be sine but it is a little -- sunny but it is a little breezy. >>> one month after the newtown, connecticut shooting people there are now talking about what should be done with the building to sandy hook eleme
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
you the deficit. but the actual debt payment, are less than 90 cents on the dollar that we take in. so even if the president as he should should pays our debts, that leaves him with 90 cents on every dollar that comes in to fund the other priorities of government and he wants to threaten not to pay that debt service. i think that's irresponsible of the president to be suggesting default on the debt. we ought to be talking about a bipartisan solution to the spending problem that got us here in the first place. >> i have heard talk in the republican conference about a one or two or three month extension on the debt ceiling. and on a continuing resolution for the budget to run the government. is that one to three month solution not still on the table? >> well, larry, we're proposing a number of different solution, both short term and long term. frankly, president obama needs to start rolling up his sleeves and focusing on both instead of sitting over in the white house and kind of throwing out all the threats to everybody across the country and running around campaigning as if he's still
, spencer michels asks california governor jerry brown if his fiscal turnaround-- from a $27 billion deficit to a balanced budget-- offers a lesson for the nation. . >> you have to make tough choices. you have to live within your means. that means you have to not do everything you want to but you also have to raise more money. >> woodruff: and ray suarez examines a surge in suicides by u.s. troops last year, far exceeding the number killed in combat in afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of landscapes and river you see differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasur. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> a with thengog suport these instituti
component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training, science medical research, all the things that help us grow. now, step by step we've made progress toward that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed in a law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduc
proclaimed his state's huge budget deficit had disappeared. but some politicians in the golden state are skeptical. newshour correspondent spencer michels sat down with brown in san francisco. his report is a co-production with our colleagues at kqed-san francisco, and begins with some background on the fiscal troubles and the budget fix. >> reporter: california's sorry financial state and cuts made to health and welfare programs have prompted nearly nonstop demonstrations at the state capital in recent times. those protests got going four years ago when california and its then governor republican arnold schwarzenegger faced a staggering budget deficit of $42 billion. the recession, built-in spending, a large population in need of state services like health and welfare, a limit on property taxes, plus republican legislators' refusal to raise taxes created a dilemma in the world's ninth largest economy. with budget cuts coming like clock work, the state's college and university systems declined in offerings and in reputation. schools suffered cutbacks in personnel and programs. servic
, although for instance if you think 40% of gun sales are done through private transactions, if that deficit may be the sales to move to retailers or licensed its readers that already do these sort of things. lori: is it frontloaded though? everybody rushing to the stars s before the announcement today. charles: that has been the trend. as an investor you have to worry about maybe a year from now the stocks, a tough comparison because you can't have every single month a record, people doing background checks. one thing that was interesting in the earnings report i thought was remarkable for the first nine months of last year gone background checks were 32%. distribution of 60%. they are running way ahead of background checks and this kind of shows you absolut tremendous demand out there for this. tracy: is it global distribution or just gunmakers? if it is global because before the united states last few weeks. charles: i think this is mostly a domestic story, but by having said that you look at a stock today. the high is a 52-week high of 60, so the stock already took a pretty good hit on
that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the stability in what is going to happen in terms of the voting of economic growth. estimate what the peak to the cut a piece of that. the spending on health not necessarily the biggest cost of the deficit right now but if you look at 20 years, for 30 years it is the alligator that is going to swallow everything. i was on a panel last week and there was a lively argument around should we raise the age for medicare, should we try to change the system and have a fee for service, has the obama administration done a lot to lower the cost of health care going forward so we don't need to do much more? what do you think is in practical terms what needs to be done on health care if you poll people they say we all want to cut medicare celerity want to go dealing with that piece of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a
s. >> while i'm willing to find middle ground to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate. not paying its bills is irresponsible. it's absurd. republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect or ransom in exchange for not crashing the america economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being res
, and the deficit doesn't seem to be getting really teenie tiny either, does it stuart? >> no, just not. 3 1/2 billion extra every single day. >> i know, amazing. stuart: tell me how it actually affects our economic growth rate. how does it it do this? >> well, now, with low, low, low, low, interest rates, it doesn't increase the use of tax receipts it pay interest on the debt. but as interest rates rise, which they will, it will have an enormously deleterious effect on growth rates. it really will and that's what we're worried about, the long run prospects of what this national debt and thereby tax receipts use today pay interest wi will do. >> i have a new report from congress, climate change is here, watch out, it's affecting us, because we humans, all our economic activity. the report was written by 240 business leaders and scientists found that climate change is having an impact on infrastructure, water supplies, crops, shore lines. art,this surely is a buildup, softening us up to the point where we will accept a carbon tax, is that right? >> it could well be. i'm not an expert on glob
there would be a method. explain. >> well, actually, the public option would decrease the deficit by about $104 billion over ten years. >> how too you know that? >> that's the congressional budget office estimate. of what it would do. this is not numbers i made up. because it would inn fact lower the -- provide an option -- this would be completely by choice -- for people who don't want to pick this public option, among the private sector choices within a health exchange, and rates for premiums are estimated to be about 5 to 7% lower, meaning those people in the exchange that needed a subsidy would take fewer tax dollars and it is also estimated that it would serve as an anchor, because there's competition, to bring down the cost of health care, even in the private sector as well. >> when is the government -- when is the government ever done that? with george bush's plan, you were critical and had a right to be for prescription drug benefit. the argument ises that it would drive down the cost of those drugs. if anything they have soared since that benefit came in because the government can
into the deficit and pay off the debt. >> you know what i didn't like today. i thought it was annoying, he may have to slow down social security payments if-- and tell you why, there's never any suggestion maybe congress shouldn't be paid salaries, the senate not be paid salaries, the president not be paid salaries, cut down on air force one. your constituent payment to go home on commercial aircraft, instead stay here and save money on travel and get the job done. there's any discussion of the politicians to take the hit it's the social security recipients. >> he wants to use the military paycheck to try to scare people and hurt the elderly. you don't have to do that, there's revenue to the treasury on a daily basis. the problem is we deficit spend about 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we collect, we spend about 10 billion a day and that means that we deficit. we have to borrow 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we spend more than 700 million dollars a day in interest on a national debt. there are lots of things to do. the president has lots of discretion to curb back that spending to make sure that soci
, particularly when you're in a deficit, the treasury of the united states would have to go out and issue bonds in order to get cash to pay for it. and that was just a cumber some, awkward thing to do. what they did was create this debt cerealing which meant t ce could issue bonds for chunks of money not related to every single law that was passed. it was just because it was cumbersome. it is not a debt control or spending control measure. the president used an analogy today, used many, to say this is like eating at a restaurant, having your fill and not paying the bill. if you want to discuss -- >> dine and dash. >> yes, dine and dash. we have two problems. one is we have to understand the terms of this thing. this is about increasing the treasury's ability to pay for things that have already been committed to by the government. the danger is if you have this discussion about not paying it, those who lend you money seem to think you're not serious about this. imagine having this conversation with american express on the line. we weren't supposed to eat out that much last month. we're only goin
the deficit. so you have to open the door to private investment to do this job of rebuilding the power platform in the united states. >> host: and the technology aspect of that is? >> guest: technology aspect is manifold. and price performance improves every 18-24 mocks. in the last year we have gotten into the innovation cycle in batteries so by the end of 2020 electric vehicles will actually be price competitive with grass-driven cars. the problem with these things is that we can't wait. we can't wait because of the environmental effects and we can't wait because we need the economy to grow quickly right now. so the book lays out a whole bunch of different ideas for bringing private investment much more quickly into the job of rebuilding the power grid. >> host: on this show, a series on the international power plant, and he doesn't necessarily agree that the internet is completely green or is terribly green. what is your thought? >> guest: he is right about that. people say that data centers in the united states account for 2% of all electricity consumption. if it isn't exactly that
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
in an administration, did any of the deficit deals that we did, were those occurring at the same time as debt ceiling raises? >> they all do. >> we've heard that that -- i'm not going to accept that, not going to do it, not the way it's done. we're not a banana republic. how many can you recall, deficit deals were affected? it's something that's done, is it not? >> standard operating procedure. we all learned about the power of the purse of democracy. back then, it used to be taxes because they couldn't borrow. now, you can borrow. taxes aren't the only strains what government can spend. the parliament and congress has to be able to control the borrowing level. that's government 101. >> is zit in g-- dis in geingeny we've already been to the restaurant and trying to stiff the bill? it wasn't the $800 stimulus or any of the things the president's done, it's congress? >> first, you're raising debt limits to cover future spending. fact one is the money hasn't been spent yet. that's not true. >> it's sort of disassembling. >> that's a good word for it. the second fact is congress hasn't approved the mone
in that regard, and they haven't experience environmental problems. and with new york's budget deficit, it seems obvious that hydrofracking is the way to go. and, of course, governor cuomo is free to set whatever regulations he wants about that to ensure the safety of quality and other things that residents are concerned about. i would say that the project should proceed. it's brought benefit to other states. there's no reason that new york should be left behind. >> okay. right in front. wait for the mic a fun. >> you get very good examples of unsuccessful creations of new green jobs. had also looked at elimination of existing jobs like really good cost-benefit analysis done for regulations? >> the cost-benefit analysis for mercury was a travesty. if you look at the cost-benefit analysis carefully, all the benefits from reducing mercury came from getting rid of particulates and particulates were not the focus of that particular regulation. and what was interesting is the benefits focus on additional days of school. in other words, a few days of schools miss, two days of work missed because of lo
heights communications. kristi, to you first. candidate obama in 2008 promised to cut the deficit in half by the end of his first term. that hasn't happened. how about by the end of his second? >> well, john, i think what's important to remember is that as president obama is starting his second term, he's doing so in a remarkably strong position with high approval ratings and a great record in his first term. when he started, as we all know, the economy was in the ditch. he was able to successfully get us out of that at the point where last week the u.s. stocks closed at their highest level in five years and was able to pass historic health care legislation. by contrast, republicans have their ratings in the toilet. what that means is that there's probably -- it's going to bode well for their ability to compromise with him and for the president to get a second term agenda passed. >> chris, i suppose you see it somewhat differently. >> she addressed political positioning and i think that's what the second term will be about, political positioning rather than solving problems. i don't know
of deficit reduction, a little short of 4 trillion we need, but he would have the american public believe he's significantly reduced our deficit as president. >> which makes you wonder why we need another 2 trillion dollars so desperately now as we are getting ready for the beginning of his second term. obviously, that's 2 1/2 trillion that is, well, fanciful in my opinion and ethereal in others and it's not a reduction in baseline, it's a reduction in the rate of growth of spending, which is again suffocating to the private economy and unsustainable over the course of the next several years. >> megyn: one thing we did hear the president reference personally, we heard it from nancy pelosi prior, but the president personally talking about now closing more loopholes and that means higher taxes. we don't know on who, but he would not specify any specific spending reductions and refusing to negotiate with the house republicans on the issue of the debt ceiling. lou, an interesting couple of months. looking forward to it. >> megyn: all right. thank you, sir. >> thanks, megyn. >> megyn: with the pr
solving the real problem, our massive deficit and debt. he's got some ideas coming up in an interview you'll see right here only on the "closing bell." stay with us. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> welcome back. the 401(k) is everywhere, and you might think everybody is saving for retirement through it. many people are not doing that at all. a new study shows one in four
in spending in exchange for raising the borrowing limit. he says trimming the budget deficit should be a different discussion. >> to even entertain the idea of this happening, of the united states of america not paying its bills, is irresponsible. >> house speaker john boehner responded to this by saying the american people do not support raising the debt ceiling without reducing government spending at the same time. you can see the battle lines there very clearly. are you in hawaii or headed there? think twice. beware of getting in the water. check out this video. that's right, sharks near oahu's yokohama beach, two sharks were spotted swimming very, very dangerously close to the shore. i hope that guy's feet are not in the water. >> wow, that is super shallow. >> if steve stockman was serious he would have mentioned secession. secession is the line -- >> that's so old. >> i'm just saying. >> don't open any can of worms when i need to go to a break. >>> polls are showing more americans support tougher gun control laws. is there any common ground in washington, d.c.? we'll talk with
. >> reporter: the president is gearing up for fights on gun control, deficit reduction, with likely deep defense budget cuts and immigration reform. on tuesday, we will know whether the vice-president will recommend an assault weapons ban. most doubt he will go that far and will look for stronger background checks. on immigration, the president looks likely to get more bipartisan support, with republicans, such as senator marco rubio, presenting similar measures to create a path to citizenship for the current 12 million illegal americans. >> thank you very much. senator lindsay graham isn en route to our studio. i will ask him about gun control and the debate and the cabinet recommendations. send us your questions for senator graham. we will ask him some of your questions. that live interview is in our next hour. in congressional democrats believe it does matter when it comes to the 14th amendment and the debt. listen to this. >> i can say that this administration does not believe that the 14th amendment gives the president the power to ignore the debt ceiling. >> shannon: all right sm.
, and the president is saying things like not to worry about the deficit. that is really for the proletarian, the more pedestrian takers among master of the deficit, the sustainable that. this is abject non says that he is doing, and he is being hailed by the national liberal media as some sort of -- some sort of articulation. >> i am one of those who is in the center, a supporter of the bowls' simpson planned and i agree with your characterization the problem is, you are offering a countervailing you. the republicans, with all due respect, are not. there is not an alternative narrative, not pushing the president to negotiate, and he is not talking to anybody. lou: i love this comment. the president saying of the second amendment is not whether we believe in the second member not. you have to literally hear this to believe it. but. >> the issue here is not whether or not we believe in the second amendment. the issue is, are there sensible steps that we can take to make sure that somebody like the individual in newtown cannot walk into a school and gun down a bunch of children. i am confident there are
spending problem go unresolved. president obama said he is open to discussing deficit reductions, but only after congress first pay this bills that the country already owes. >> the federal government takes a larger chunk of paychecks. that's because during the fiscal cliff debate, congress allowed a temporary cut in social security taxes to expire, mean that social security taxes have increase thousand by 2%. economists anticipate the payroll increase tax hike will reduce u.s. house hold incomes by a collective $125 billion this year. >>> a another brutely cold night and into tomorrow morning. it is going to be freezing and below freezing once again. a look here at the pattern. we remain with the trough to the east of us. a ridge of high pressure to the west, but this ridge is slowly nudging east, and eventually, by midweek wednesday and lasting into the weekend, it will be overis, and that is going to bringis warmer weather. so warmer weather on the horizon, it's not going to be here in time for tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning very cold once again. lows sinking back into the 20s and 30
he is open to discussing deficit reductions, but only after congress first pay this bills that the country already owes. >> the federal government takes a larger chunk of paychecks. that's because during the fiscal cliff debate, congress allowed a temporary cut in social security taxes to expire, mean that social security taxes have increase thousand by 2%. economists anticipate the payroll increase tax hike will reduce u.s. house hold incomes by a collective $125 billion this year. >>> a another brutely cold night and into tomorrow morning. it is going to be freezing and below freezing once again. a look here at the pattern. we remain with the trough to the east of us. a ridge of high pressure to the west, but this ridge is slowly nudging east, and eventually, by midweek wednesday and lasting into the weekend, it will be overis, and that is going to bringis warmer weather. so warmer weather on the horizon, it's not going to be here in time for tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning very cold once again. lows sinking back into the 20s and 30s. if you're just joining us, freeze
these books available to you. "scattered" is about attention deficit disorder. yours for a contribution of $75. it is a wonderful book by gabor mate, who himself was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. he talks about the drugging of america's children, millions of them, and what that means for them growing up, for their emotional development. that book is yours for $75. we ask you to stand up for independent media. we cannot do this without you. and then there is "when the body says no." can a person literally die of loneliness? is there a connection between inhibited a motion and outside? is there a cancer personality? modern research is confirming the age old wisdom that emotions affect our physiology. repressed emotion bring on stress and can lead to disease. the book is provocative, beautifully written, providing fresh information regarding these and other issues regarding the effects of stress the -- stress on half. the doctor summarizes the latest scientific findings about the roles that stress play in an individual. emotions like anger,-the role of defending our boundaries. when
up 4 consecutive trillion-dollar federal budget deficits in his first term. he has an economy that is not being returned to prosperity. 23 million people still unemployed. we have, i think bill. i think if i may. you undersell folks just a little bit in that i think everybody is smart enough to know there is is a problem. i think everybody is pretty much smart enough to know that we have got to come up with a solution. when you have a national media part of this coalition of interest and depen dense on the democratic party, there is no way for them to have validation. there is no way for them to have an aggressive watchdog that would normally, traditionally, historically be attacking the miss adventure of those in power. >> we agree that the media is in the tank. i'm almost stunned that you think, to quote you, everybody understands the issue. i will tell you why, you go right outside the fox news channel building now and you stop people and go what about the federal debt? come on. >> let me put it in some context. there was a time in this country and everybody may be slightly
would be able to reduce the deficit by $150 billion. not a bad idea. and then if you could do all this and would only cost the average driver less than $1 per week per car, would that be a reasonable burden to impose? so i'm floating the idea. we are beginning discussions with senator mark warner of virginia. he was part of the gang of six, gang of eight. we are encouraged by what we're hearing from him. chairman bill shuster in the house came to our meeting in pittsburgh in november, and he said, listen, folks, we know that the central question congress will have to address next year is revenue. we are open to ideas. no guarantee that they can pass anything. but bill shuster is open to any and all ideas. so what i'm asking you to do is to join us in the battle that lies ahead this next couple of years and demand that congress provide long-term funding for transportation. you know, the big issue that every member of congress is concerned about is with deficits, long-term fiscal viability of the country and cutting spending and raising revenue, that combination is what people seem
for the taxpayers' use or the expression goes, to reduce the federal deficit. >> thank you, gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> mr. hastings. >> i don't have any questions. >> thank you very much. without a doubt of funds, which i'm working on, -- [inaudible] [laughter] >> thank you, mr. chairman. i ask that the gentleman, i know he's speaking on behalf of the constituents when we bring the amendment to the bill, the size of the package with the addition of your amendment, becomes larger than many entire appropriations bills. $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill. mr. king, that's larger than the financial services appropriation bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill. these are bills from which this congress deliberates for months. hearing the chairman say before you came up to testify that he was committed to making sure that your folks get those things that they need. hearing the priorities that everyone has laid out, knowing these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are need
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next day-to-day. jon: so what about that statement from the president, true or false? a fact check on that and a bunch of others. we'll have the answers for you coming up. jon: right now lawmakers are working on a strategy to try to keep the government running. they only have about 4-6 weeks left before the nation hits the national debt ceiling. republicans are calling for budge cuts in return for raising the debt ceiling, but president obama came out swinging during his news conference on monday claiming he's already gone a long way toward closing the budget gap. joining us now to fact check some of his statements, stephen hayes, a senior writer for the weekly standard and a fox news contributor, douglas holtz-eakin is now president of the american action forum. just as a general rule, steven, when you heard the president speaking in that news conference, was he generally being honest with the american people about
a conversation about how to redust our deficit let's have that. we've been having that nor the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. by the way the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need for us to grow this economy. martha: bob beckel is former democratic campaign manager and cohost of the five. mary katherine ham is editor at large and fox news contributor. why do you think it was so testy yesterday? >> obama's best form is not necessarily a press conference which is why he does than do many of them. i which he was testy for one real reason. the republicans trying to take the full faith and crucify the united states currency and putting it at fist being. i'd invoke the 14th amendment, we'd problem below know that if we spent more time with the republicans wasting time on the floor of the house. i thought he ought to raise it and to hell with congress. martha: we talked to stewart varney and kirsten said in that sound byte, this isn't about default, people don't think we aren't going to pay the debt o
the debt ceiling. this is the question we posed. is reduce the federal deficit a worthy goal? this is interesting you may recall white house press secretary made news by stating that deficit reduction is, quote not a worthy goal onto itself. 77% of voters disagree with them and that includes large majorities of republicans, independents and democrats. what is your take on this? >> again i don't want to be a downer here, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23%
. he will have to talk a lot more in the state of the union about deficit control. we have this new fox poll out tonight to. people are upset about fiscal cliff deal. when asked if their paycheck is smaller this year because of more taxfuls being taken out 60% say yes 25% say no. he is going to have to talk about more deficit reduction. they will do a will little partying this weekend they real lives it's right back to work, bill. >> word of a solution to prevent the united states from defaultingen its debt. the house majority leader eric cantor saying that lawmakers will vote next week on a short-term plan to let the government borrow more money effectively raising the debt ceiling. the deal not all worked out just yet. but apparently it this will not require the spending cuts that house republicans had wanted. just released fox news poll finds that 69% favor raising the debt limit only if there are major spending cuts involved. and 23% say it's reckless not to raise it regardless. the poll also shows more than 8 in 10 think government spending is out of control. only 11% believes it's
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